Auxiliary headlamps legislation - are they allowed to use?

Posted by MDC Driver on

One of the most asked questions by the community of classic car enthusiasts is the legality of the use of auxiliary headlamps, whether long-range or fog lamps.

Certainly, the legislation is difficult to decipher for less specialists and also too specific and long for them to be more lazy to read an extensive decree.

We will try to help understand in which situations we can equip our classic cars with this type of headlights, as well as give some recommendations for their use.

  • How many headlights can I mount?

The limit is 4 high-beam headlights, that is, 2 high-beam auxiliary lights can be applied (taking into account that the 2 series headlights already have this capacity). 2 more headlamps can be fitted as long as they are not activated as main beam (eg fog)

  • Is it necessary to have a switch to turn on the auxiliary lights?

Yes. It is one of the biggest reasons for getting caught by inspection center agents. Also note that this connection is made online, so that the auxiliaries only light up when the serial highs are turned on.

  • How to know if the headlights are homologated?

It is an important point that can also be penalized. Approved headlamps have an imprint engraved on the glass that begins with the letter E, followed by a number. Anyone with this badge will be able to circulate.

Conclusion:

Considering the experiences told by several people, we know that even following all these recommendations, situations still occur in which many vehicles fail inspections. It is a recurrent situation, either due to bad faith on the part of those who inspect or lack of knowledge.

We would like to know your opinion on whether you have already experienced any situation with the application of headlights or if, on the other hand, you know any other details that we can mention to help the community.

 


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